This Friday! One Man, One Camera, One Tripod…

In a few short days my exhibition entitled One Man, One Camera, One Tripod will open at the Estevan Art Gallery and Museum ( For directions click here ). I invite everyone to attend the artist reception held at Friday November 23rd at 7pm!

I am truly excited about the development of this exhibition. The collection will surround the deconstructive look of my travel notes and subsequent photo book of my backpacking adventures through Costa Rica. I am very excited to share the many stories behind the photos of the different aspects of my journey. I absolutely love learning about different places, people, and cultures. Costa Rica is a land rich with exotic animals and I absolutely relished the spiritual journey and connection I was able to share with a few of these creatures as they allowed me to observe their behaviour.

This Chestnut Mandibled Toucan and I briefly shared one of these aforementioned moments, and I giddy with excitement and I witnessed the estranged, to me, behaviour displayed by this amazing creature.

View or Purchase this image at ByronFichter.com by clicking here

If you want to hear the story of the moment I shared with this beautiful bird, and more from Costa Rica please join me Friday at 7pm!

My Seafood Restaurant Photo!

Photo pre scouting plays a huge part in my travel planning, I always have a certain amount of photographs that I expect to capture during my adventure. My inspiration comes from so many different crazy places. I am always jotting down notes and snapping pics with my phone for future reference.

During my travels to Prince Edward Island I knew the opportunity to snag “my seafood restaurant” photo would present itself. You know what I am talking about. Cliche marine artifacts strewn about. Hanging over every table setting is that cliche seascape, you can almost smell the salty air. For as long as I have been doing photography, I have wanted to shoot a seascape worthy of any eateries wall.

As I approached the “Hailey Jo” glistening in the sunshine, I knew this was it. The boat housed, perfectly weathered, lining the background. Lobster traps, stacked and waiting for their next catch, helping me achieve mine.

See “Hailey Jo” on byronfichter.com by CLICKING HERE.

Creepy Saskatchewan… The Crooked Bush…

Twisted, paranormal fantasy. Is this a Tim Burton movie? Perhaps something more sinister, or merely coincidence?

There is 3 acres of land in Saskatchewan, that is unlike any other 3 acres of land on the planet. What happens on this 3 acres of land, is unexplainable.

Welcome to The Crooked Trees of Alticane. Located in No Where, Saskatchewan, or more realistically 20 kilometres north – north west of Hafford, Saskatchewan (Google Maps Link). What is special about this particular grove of trees, is that they do not grow straight. Rather they twist and tangle their way to the sky in a gorgeously visual fashion. It is absolutely stunning, especially when right across the road the trees are all perfectly straight in comparison.

I had always wanted to visit this site, and being in the area ear marked the perfect opportunity to do so. The site is off the beaten path, however is worth the adventure. The opportunity to witness a natural phenomenon is an experience worth having. The aspen trees on this particular plot of land, inherit a genetic mutation that makes them unlike any other aspen trees. How they came to exist in the middle of No Where, Saskatchewan remains a mystery. There are however, plenty of theories on this topic. The paranormal, and extra terrestrial, all have there place in the local tales or lore. The locals will also tell you that birds, and cows will not enter the area. I did not see any of either.

What I do know, is that I am glad I took the afternoon to wander the paths, camera in hand and enjoy a natural wonder, right here at home in Saskatchewan.

New Release… Lake Life…

My first visit to Waskesiu was very long over due. Almost a right of passage to being a Saskatchewan resident, is visiting the infamous lake located in the Prince Albert National Park.

As luck would have it on my recent tour of northern Saskatchewan, I was able to spend about 48 hours in the park. It will not be my last.

Unfortunately a large part of the short stay was mired with storm clouds and light rain. However there was a small window of opportunity, and I was not about to let it pass. After hiking one of the many ultra scenic trails around the lake, I found this section of lake edge that jutted out from the naturally smooth shoreline. Almost as if it knew I was coming, there was a perfect tree leaning out towards the water, its base weakened by erosion giving it the perfect aesthetic for my lens. I made note of the spot, and I knew the sunset would align perfect for the quintessential lake side paradise image I was seeking. I returned to the spot at dusk, and as anticipated, the skies delivered a trademark Saskatchewan sunset which set the scene perfectly.

With a limited time crunch, I could not be more pleased with Lake Life. The image excites me for future adventure in Waskesiu, with ample time, and hopefully improved weather conditions for proper scouting and set up. The possibilities are endless as the visitors to the national park are seemingly treated to endless beauty on a daily basis.

Lake Life is available on byronfichter.com by clicking here

Visiting a Saskatchewan landmark, Borden Bridge…

The Borden Bridge famously crosses the North Saskatchewan River on Saskatchewan Highway 16.

Borden Bridge, North Saskatchewan River, Saskatchewan Highway 16

Purchase this photo from byronfichter.com (click here)

The bridge constructed during the Great Depression was a government funded “make work” project. Creating jobs for locals who had fallen on tough times during the drought.

Decommissioned since 1985, it is still open to foot traffic. I would highly recommend pulling over and spending a few minutes enjoying the gorgeous view of the North Saskatchewan river, and marvelling at the amazing architecture that is Borden Bridge.

Find it now on Google Maps (click here)